Kay Van Norman

Kay Van Norman
Kay Van Norman, founder and President of Brilliant Aging, is an internationally known subject matter expert in healthy aging. She directed the Kaiser Institute on Aging, serves on national and international boards, speaks internationally, and has an extensive list of publications including a Chinese translation of her latest book, Exercise and Wellness for Older Adults. An early pioneer and thought leader in senior wellness, her writing, speaking, product innovations and consulting work has substantially shaped the international active aging movement and seniors housing and care industry.

Recent Posts

What’s Your Vitality Plan?

Posted by Kay Van Norman on Sep 2, 2017 10:07:08 AM

Blog - Whats Your Vitality Plan

 

Building financial security and maintaining health are consistently listed as top aging concerns for adults over 55. Most of us know creating a financial portfolio (make a plan, balance assets, make regular deposits) is important to ensure lifelong financial security.

 

But what about your vitality?  Do you have a plan? Have you considered what “assets” you need to support lifelong vitality?

The Dignity of Risk

Posted by Kay Van Norman on Jul 15, 2017 9:54:27 AM

Two Elders in my life, Eldo and Harriet, taught me about the dignity of risk – one aspect of resilience and independence that is often overlooked as people age.  It’s far too common for well intentioned helpers to pressure older adults – especially those with functional challenges – into a safety bubble. The dignity of risk simply allows people regardless of age or functional ability to continue making the choice of how to live – how to balance personal risk with safety.

 

Aging Equals Frailty is Just a Myth

Posted by Kay Van Norman on Jun 13, 2017 6:51:33 PM

There has been an explosion of articles on how to help adults continue to “live in their own homes”. Many articles make a great case for the benefits of universal design, but I’m really bothered by their hidden undercurrent of negative expectations of aging. For example, rather than focusing on functional impairments regardless of age they heavily reference “golden years, senior access, barriers to seniors, and senior friendly”.  So along with helpful information about how to remain living in your home, is a large helping of the message that functional impairment is an unavoidable consequence of aging.